Computer Science 210
Data Structures

Fall 2017, Siena College

Instructor and Course Information


Dr. James D. Teresco, Roger Bacon 321, (518) 782-6992
Electronic mail: jteresco AT (best contact method)
Twitter: @JTerescoSienaCS
Class URL: [Link]
Class hour: Monday, Friday 10:20-11:20, Roger Bacon 302
Lab meetings: Wednesday 8:10-10:10 or 10:30-12:30, Roger Bacon 306
Office hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 2-3:30, and by appointment


The primary text for the course is Programming in Java and Data Structures (an online, interactive text from zyBooks) by Lysecky, Lizarraga, Vahid, and McGovern. The supplementary text for the course is Java Structures: Data Structures in Java for the Principled Programmer, "Root 7" Edition (a free online textbook) by Duane Bailey. This more traditional text has been made freely available as a PDF by the author. Other readings may also be assigned from freely available sources.

Course News

Submission Guidelines

Your submissions for lab and project assignments will include several types of items. Different requirements apply to each, as described below. It is important that you adhere to file format and naming requirements to facilitate grading. Submissions that do not meet these requirements will not be accepted.

Lab Questions
The answers to all "lab questions" will normally be written on the lab handout you receive when you arrive in lab.
Practice Programs
Your submissions for practice programs are graded primarily on correctness, but you will be required to include your name at the top of the program, and you must use the file name specified. You will normally demonstrate practice programs and submit them electronically, but no printout needs to be submitted.

You are of course encouraged to practice good documentation, formatting, and style for these programs, but the grade will depend only on correctness (and having your name in a properly-named file).

Programming Assignments
These are the most formal submissions and will be graded on design, documentation, style, correctness, and efficiency (where appropriate). A good design will use an appropriate algorithm, data structures, and language constructs to solve the problem. A well-documented program will include a comment at the top of each file that includes your name, the assignment, and a description of the contents of the file. There should also be comments for each constructor or method definition (including a brief description of the method's purpose, its parameters, and return value), each variable or group of related variables, and any section of code whose purpose and/or behavior is not obvious from context or the code itself. Style requirements include appropriate formatting (sufficient and consistent indentation, spacing, and punctuation, wrapping long lines of code), good use of named constants, and meaningful and appropriate names for variables, methods, constants, and parameters. Correctness, of course, requires the expected output be produced for a set of test inputs (which will normally not be provided in advance). Efficiency will be more important in some assignments than others, and requires that the program does not do any unnecessary computation or use any more memory than needed. And, of course, you must use the file name(s) specified. You will normally be required to demonstrate programming assignments, submit your source code electronically, and submit a printout of your program.

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